NGCL 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop welcomes sponsors aboard

ngcl_logo_2 Kopie

The Namibian-German Centre for Logistics (NGCL) will host its 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop in Walvis Bay. It will do so in collaboration with its industry-partners, many who have already signed up as sponsors for this annual event. The two-day workshop, with a third day of training seminars takes place from 4th-6th October, 2017. The theme for this year’s workshop is; Namibia as an Logistics Hub: An Opportunity

The close cooperation and sponsorship by industry-leading organisations and academic institutes have seen the workshop flourish year on year. It is therefore also an eagerly anticipated event within the Transport and Logistics Industry as well as beyond. Sponsors like DAAD – The German Academic Exchange Service, Development Bank Namibia, Southern Business School Namibia (SBS Namibia), Walvis Bay Corridor Group (WBCG) and Namibia Breweries Limited are just some of the organisations that will make this year’s workshop a success.

Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST), DAAD and SBS Namibia not only help make the workshop happen through financial and ‘in-kind’ sponsorship, but they also are knowledge partners and bring essential and sector-relevant input into the workshop sessions. WBCG’s CEO, Johny Smith will deliver the keynote address and a case study of the group will also be presented during the workshop.  Delivering and sharing high calibre logistics success stories, best practices and seminars. These organisations are joined by expert participants from the logistics and transport sector, government, industry, as well as academia and logistics students.

The theme this year focuses on the opportunity the Namibian logistics hub provides. The development surrounding the logistics hub is receiving attention from government, policy makers and planners to drive the attraction of international investors and organisations. The theme will highlight the developments within the country and looks at opportunities for future trade. It will include sharing and implementation of best practices as well as systems and case studies within the logistics and transport industry.

Workshop Swk 2016

Key topics that will be covered during the two-day event include:

DAY ONE:

  • Customs and Excise and its promotion within the logistics hub
  • Future of transport in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Investment and Financing opportunities for the sector

DAY 2:

  • The role of private sector in promoting port development
  • Supply Chain Visualisations and Freight Forwarder Challenges

Logan Fransman, Director of the NGCL said; “This is our 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop and we couldn’t be prouder of having these great sponsors support us and the vitally important Transportation and Logistics sector through this Workshop.  The Government of Namibia identified logistics and transport sector as critical to the development of all sectors of the economy and our theme this year; Namibia as a Logistics Hub: An Opportunity will stimulate further development in this sector and boost growth and ultimately the economy.”

 The two day workshop takes place in Walvis Bay’s Protea Hotel, Pelican Bay from October 4-6th, 2017. To attend the workshops please contact: Mercelyne Maletzky, 061 2072909 or e-mail mmaletzky@nust.na

Alternatively, follow this link: http://www.centreforlogistics.org/

 

WBCG logo DAAD FUAS logoNBLSBS NamibiaDBN

CEMEREM – image video online available for the “Centre of Excellence for Mining, Environmental Engineering and Resource Management”

filming in Kenya for the CEMEREM DAAD centre by zazudesign 2017 filming in Kenya for the CEMEREM DAAD centre by zazudesign 2017

“Vor der Schippe ist es duster!”, is a German miners saying, meaning “It’s dark in front of the shovel.”
We have put some light there and now the image video of the centre is ready to be presented.

 

After some changes in the hosting of the DAADs website, finally the new image video of the Centre of Excellence for Mining, Environmental Engineering and Resource Management is also ready to be implemented in your website.

As with the videos before, follow these steps:

  1. go to http://www.zazudesign.de/die-schwarzwald-werbeagentur/embed-video/ and copy the code, after you have chosen the centre in the drop down menu
  2. paste the code in the HTML-code of you website
  3. Done!

The videos maximum width is 640 pixel. Up to this size it will adjust automatically to different screen sizes (smart phone, laptop). You can choose between the original version in English, with English subtitles and with German subtitles.

 

If you need the video for a live presentation, please contact Sylvia Vogt or Dr. Dorothee Weyler in Bonn .They have different versions available for bigger screens and beamer.

 

For any questions, just send me a mail:

thomas.hezel@zazudesign.de

 

Author:

NGCL Director gives his vision of the role of Logistics in achieving Namibia’s National Development Plan

ngcl_logo_2 KopieDAAD

Transportation and Logistics essential to achieving NDP 5 goals of Namibia

As Director of Namibian German Centre for Logistics (NGCL) here in Namibia, I am tasked with promoting and highlighting the Importance of our sector. I was therefore very pleased to see that Transport and Logistics is included in the National Development Plan 5 (NDP 5), just like it had in the previous Development Plans.

The logistics sector is essential for trade, industrialization, socio-economic development and regional

integration and is therefore seen as a key developmental priority. The sector has been fortunate in the sense that the Government is very aware of how critical it is and has invested over the  past 20 years in transport infrastructure development (roads, rail, maritime ports, and aviation). These investments have enabled Namibia to position itself as a logistics hub within the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC). These investments are also one of the reasons that DAAD together with the Namibia University for Science and Technology established NGCL as a Centre of expertise and excellence in the field of logistics.

Namibia has been consistently improving its position on the Global Competitiveness Index, moving to 24 out of 138 countries in 2016/2017. With investments, increased expertise and professionalisation of the Logistics and Transportation sector our country can improve its competitiveness even further. This will allow the sector to enhance industrial development and contribute substantially to the GDP. It is easier said than done, as the low hanging fruit and quick wins in the sector have all been tackled. We are now looking at a much more  holistic and integrated approach to transport planning,  as well as the handling of goods, transporting of people and providing services.  This needs to fall within the parameters and the framework of the Transport Master Plan and Master Plan of an International Logistics Hub for SADC Countries.

It all sounds rather grand, but it is essential to be able to achieve these goals and look to 2022 and beyond, to remain competitive. If we as a nation and as a sector can achieve this through partnerships and investments, we will be able to improve targets in;  agriculture, mining, manufacturing, fisheries, rural and urban development and tourism. We therefore need to work together to create a sustainable transport system supporting a world-class logistics hub connecting SADC to international markets by 2022. This means tackling some very basic issues, that require a great deal of focus and attention as well as huge continued investment. Something which will be a real challenge in the present economic climate of Namibia.

Logan Fransman

Access to financial resources for our sector, as for every sector in Namibia remains a problem. This causes delays and inadequate funding for development of transport infrastructure, inadequate skills and imbalance between the development and preservation of infrastructure. Knowledge transference and development of technical skills such as NGCL and NUST offer need to be complemented by private and public enterprises opening their doors to allow new transport and logistics graduates to learn and flourish within this exciting and growing sector. Without these opportunities the growth, development and ultimately the sustainability of the sector will suffer.  If these challenges are met head-on and invested in we can be sure that by  2022 Namibia will have a safe, reliable, affordable and sustainable transport infrastructure, a world-class logistic hub connecting SADC to international markets. One that will be the envy of the region and the engine to our economy.

One final thought with regards to transport and logistics in this country is the pledge by Government to reduce the number of road deaths on our roads. As we know, it is pure carnage on our very empty roads and the statistics don’t lie. Should we want to be the logistics hub of SADC, it will need to start with road safety at its very core. Without this, everything else we try to do will be in vain.

 

Should these and other aspects of Logistics interest you, do join us at the 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop from October 4th-6th in Walvis Bay, Namibia.

Experts, researchers and sector professionals as well as students will all congregate to discuss a myriad of topics regarding Logistics in the SADC region.  Together with many sponsors and co-hosts it is a must-attend event for Logistics and Transport Professionals.

Register here:

DAAD Network Meeting 2017 in Kenya – Video online

DAAD Network Meeting Kenya 2017 DAAD Network Meeting Kenya 2017

Is the attention span of an academic longer than the regular internet attention span of some seconds?

I said yes, and here comes a video of 12 minutes length. Claus Pakleppa summing up, what took place at the Network Meeting 2017 in Kenya.

The video is available as a HD version for larger presentations on TV screens and bigger computer monitors from Dr. Dorothee Weyler.

For the implementation in your own website or any other web presentation you can use the embedding code that you will find here:

http://www.zazudesign.de/die-schwarzwald-werbeagentur/embed-video/

Go at “Wählen Sie hier!” to the last entry then copy and paste the code from the zazudesign website in your HTML source code of your web presentation and –  done!

note:
This blog software is omitting code in the form of iframes, so here it doesn’t work.

 

Author:

NUST Transport and Logistics Society members go on educational trip to Durban

The Transport and Logistics Society students of the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) recently took a trip to Durban, South Africa to understand the market of logistics on a global scale.  Durban was chosen as the destination for this trip because the port of Durban is the busiest port in Africa.

 

durban trip group 2Dr Fanny Saruchera (far left), the NUST Transport and Logistics Society Committee members (in white) and the society members in front of the NUST bus parked at the Port of Durban, South Africa

After 20 hours of driving we finally saw the city lights of Durban with logistics being very visible through the continuous stream of trucks leaving Durban heading to their various destinations. After some much needed rest, we headed off to the Maritime School of Excellence by the Port of Durban.

The knowledgeable staff of Transnet gave us a detailed presentation of what happens in the port and how it is maintained. We were shown their impressive shipping simulators and also educated of the different courses they offer. On the tour boat called “Isiponono, we navigated the entire port and got a fantastic insight into Durban Port. Large shipping vessels docking, offloading, and heading out, every aspect of logistics was on show for us.  Students were exposed to a little bit of what it took to build and run a port as big and as busy as the port of Durban, these were some of the operations we were able to witness.

Isipono

Port of Durban knowledge

The trip to the port of Durban began with the Maritime school of excellence that specializes in teaching programs ranging from machine handling to basic management. The school specializes in multimodal transportation courses and also works with the port of Walvis Bay.

The students also got to see the Maritime museum and got a great history lesson on boats, ships and fishing and how it first started in South Africa.

Our Society members were treated to a luxurious boat cruise which had delicious platters of food set out for us whilst enjoying the stunning views of beautiful Durban. The next stop was the largest marine aquarium in Africa, UShaka Marine World, where the dolphins stole the show. We managed some “fun in the sun” at the nearby Durban South Beach famous for surfing. This is where students had a chance to interact with members of the public to find out more about the language and the culture.

On our long trip back to Windhoek, we were given  a short presentation on how the Namibian Customs office works regarding imports and exports on the Namibian side. This is another vital aspect of logistics and transportation and goods cannot move without clearing customs.

Extra benefits
On the bus ride from place to place our amazing drivers; Mr. Kakei and Mr. Naughton (passionately known as the “anti-virus”) were kind enough to teach the students how to do vehicle inspection and they got to make practical their theoretical knowledge. Logistics is all about knowing how to keep things moving, so this was essential training for us.

Conclusion
We can look back on a successful trip. The Logistics Society hopes to have more of these educational trips to broaden our knowledge in our field of study and to gain unprecedented amount of experience. With the assistance of NUST, NGCL and DAAD we can really improve our logistical knowledge and be ready to be competitive in the market as well-rounded logistics experts. We plan to take more students on such trips and possibly expand our reach to places like Cape Town or Port Elizabeth. We would like to thank the University, our main sponsor Namibian-German Centre for Logistics (NGCL) together with DAAD and Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL) as a whole for making this trip possible and allowing us as students to open our eyes to better opportunities out there.

New Era newpaper also published an article about the trip:

New Era_Durban visit_31 May 2017_2

 

CHREA – the fruit of Congolese German Center of Microfinance

Three CCAM alumni have created a successful consulting firm. Christian Eanga, Dave Mobhe and Christopher Mukoka decided not to seek for a job but build their own wealth. They were confident with the knowledge gained during their time at the Congolese German Center of Microfinance.

CHREA Strategy was created in September 2016, only two months after their graduation and less than a year later, Christian Eanga, Dave Mobhe and Christopher Mukoka are moving to a bigger office. Dave Mobhe said that there are three courses or module they used every day to run their business. The module of Professor Patrick Bakengela Politic and Strategy of Enterprise is the foundation of CHREA Strategy.  « As consulting firm the module of strategy and politic of enterprise helps us to run our firm while solving the problem of clients, we have to thanks the Center for the trip we went to Bukavu and Goma, witnessing the way Prof Frederick Kalala was consulting two of the big microfinances intuitions in the eastern part of the Congo, inspired us to create CHREA », said Dave.

Today, CHREA Strategy employed one full time employee and one intern.

NGCL’s 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop:

ngcl_logo_2 Kopie                 DAAD

Theme: Namibia Logistics Hub: An Opportunity for Growth

Who started the annual logistics workshop?
The Namibian German Centre for Logistics (NGCL) is the driver behind  the annual logistics and transport workshop. The NGCL is an institute at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) and functions as an Education Excellence Initiative for logistics specialists, executives. As well as supporting and carrying out the applied research of logistical problems in the SADC region. NGCL initiated the workshops, but it is truly an annual industry event with the full support from various industry stakeholders.

When did the workshop start?
The first workshop was held in 2009, in Walvis-Bay, and was attended by 80 delegates. NGCL in partnership with various stakeholders hosted eight workshops so far. The workshops have been a resounding success and have been attended by participants from across the logistics and transport industry in Namibia and from abroad. It has grown in size and stature and become a ‘not to be missed’ fixture on the logistics agenda for the Southern African region.

What was the idea behind the workshop?
The Government of Namibia identified logistics and transport sector as critical to the development of all sectors of the economy in its Vision 2030 and NDP-4. Logistics acts as a catalyst for the national economy.  The main objectives of the logistics sector are to contribute to national development through the provision of logistics and transport services.  It was essential to build a platform where industry could interact with international and regional partners from the academic world as well as global industry leaders in logistics and transport.

Learning to drive a forklift truck like a Boss!
Logistics in action

Who attends the event and what are some of the benefits?
More than 100 participants attended the last workshop, with delegates coming not just from Namibia, but from right across the Southern Africa region and further afield. The delegates range from operational level employees in different industries right up to senior management and policy makers. Of course there are also academics and students that participate, ensuring knowledge is shared and industry expectations are met. The benefits for the Namibian logistics and transport industry are the engagement with local, regional and international delegates and speakers, as well as learning from successful case studies.

What was the idea behind the theme for this year?
The theme this year focuses on the opportunity the Namibian logistics hub provides. The development surrounding the logistics hub is receiving attention from government, policy makers and planners to drive the attraction of international investors and organisations. The theme will highlight the developments within the country and looks at opportunities for future trade. It will include sharing and implementation of  best practices as well as systems and case studies within the logistics and transport industry.

Who are the presenters or speakers at the workshop?
The workshop will feature a host of local industry speakers as well as academia, complemented by regional and international experts. Speakers will share their knowledge through their current or past projects within their organisations.  Best practises will feature that have shown tangible results, giving the participants real insight. The workshop has a research component to it, and several academics will present on published work that will benefit and enlighten the delegates.

Who are some various stakeholders involved in the workshop?
The workshop has evolved over the years to include key stakeholders from different sectors and industries, like the Southern Business School (SBS), Walvis-bay Corridor Group (WBCG), TransWorld Cargo, Namport, Namibian Logistics Association (NLA), Trans-Kalahari Corridor Secretariat (TKCS), and the National Road Safety Council (NRSC).

What are some of the topics for this year’s workshop?

DAY 1:

  • Customs and Excise and its promotion within the logistics hub
  • Future of transport in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Investment opportunities

DAY 2:

  • Supply Chain Visualisations
  • Logistics Skills Gaps

Why should you participate?
Delegates and participants will:

  • Gain valuable awareness of the regional and international market;
  • Be a part of a network which includes both public and private sector organisations;
  • Learn from stimulating, world-class international and local speakers’ presentations, and participate in interactive Q & A sessions after each presentation.

For more information or to sign up do not hesitate to contact:

Mr. Logan Fransman
Director
Namibia German Centre for Logistics (NGCL)
Tel: +264 (0)61 207 2909
E-mail: lfransman@nust.na

Education Research for Social Change: publication

Dear Colleagues

The Editors are pleased to announce the online publication of the tenth issue, Vol. 6 No. 1 April 2017 of the Journal ‘Education Research for Social Change’.

The theme is ‘Africanizing educational research and practice’ and the guest editor is CERM-ESA’s project leader at NMMU, Paul Webb. CERM-ESA has contributed several papers, amongst them a project report that gives you insights on how we work and how CERM-ESA contributes to Africanisation, engagement and social change. Here is the link to the tenth issue:
http://ersc.nmmu.ac.za/view_edition.php?v=6&n=1

And here is the link directly to the CERM-ESA Project Report:

Educational Research for Social Change is an international peer-reviewed journal established in 2012 (an initiative of the Faculty of Education, NMMU) and received DoHET accreditation in January 2016. ERSC is also included in the IBSS from February 2016.

See http://ersc.nmmu.ac.za or ersc.nmmu.ac.za

Please read and enjoy!