Workshop

NGCL successfully hosts 9th Annual Logistics and Transport workshop in Walvis Bay

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Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) Namibian-German Centre for Logistics (NGCL) together with its partners and sponsors successfully hosted its 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop in Walvis Bay. The three-day workshop themed: Namibian Logistics Hub: An opportunity for growth took place from 4th-6th October. It attracted over 80 delegates from across the country and the region and welcomed numerous experts  from logistics and transport sectors as well as Government, industry and academia.

The opening ceremony was graced by the Japanese Ambassador to Namibia, Hideyuki Sakamoto, who showed Japan’s commitment to providing expertise to the country’s logistics and transport development. Namibia’s Ministry of Works and Transport showed their support for the workshop and the platform given to the Transport & Logistics industry during these sessions in Walvis Bay. The Ministry emphasised that capacity building is the cornerstone of growing the economy and the nation as a whole.

The workshop had a blend of local and international speakers that shared their experiences, case studies, best practises and they highlighted some opportunities for growth that comes with a logistics hub vision. Topics like “How Corridors are established, and the Importance of geographic analytics to supply chains” were hot topics for discussion. Another highlight of the workshop was a presentation on the priorities for Namibia to grab opportunities through the Logistics Master Plan implementation. New topics like financing options for transport and logistics gave real insight and perspectives and updated the delegates on the status of the country in terms of leverage and financial outlooks.  The delegates were able to have frank and open discussions with technical experts and business developers on the growth expected. But, also what still needs to be done before the country can boast of being a world-class supply chain facilitator.

The workshop was well attended by students from different levels of studies that ensure capacity continues among the future graduates and workforce in the logistics sector. A poster competition for researching students featured during the event to give delegates some perspectives on the research activities of students in the country.

Local development updates on the Walvis Bay Port expansion and customs and excise initiatives updated the delegates on the dynamic developments that Namibia is undergoing. The workshop took the delegates on a tour of the Port. The successful workshop concluded with a spectacular gala evening. The gala evening featured Mr. Johny Smith, the CEO of the Walvis-bay Corridor Group, who gave a rousing speech on thinking ahead and tips on ensuring growth in the future.

The workshop concluded with training seminars on the third day, on relevant topics like Procurement and Purchasing, Warehousing and Stock Management and a Customs and Excise Information Sessions. These seminars add an extra dimension to the workshop and really add value by providing learning and professional development options for delegates.

Logan Fransman, Director of the NGCL said; “The workshop is a great platform as it shares trends, knowledge and information in logistics, transportation and supply chain management. The fact that we had a full house of delegates during these trying economic times demonstrates what an important fixture the Transport & Logistics Workshop is each year. Having our important partners and sponsors on board like DAAD – The German Academic Exchange Service, Development Bank Namibia, Southern Business School Namibia (SBS Namibia), Walvis Bay Corridor Group (WBCG) and Namibia Breweries Limited made the workshop an even greater success.”

The mission of the NGCL is to contribute to the economic development of Namibia and the region by providing the expertise and strategies that promote and further logistics. Next year will see the 10th Annual Workshop take place and judging on previous workshops, this will be even better, bigger and all-inclusive when it comes to the Namibian and regional Logistics and Transportation sector.

 

 

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NGCL 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop welcomes sponsors aboard

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The Namibian-German Centre for Logistics (NGCL) will host its 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop in Walvis Bay. It will do so in collaboration with its industry-partners, many who have already signed up as sponsors for this annual event. The two-day workshop, with a third day of training seminars takes place from 4th-6th October, 2017. The theme for this year’s workshop is; Namibia as an Logistics Hub: An Opportunity

The close cooperation and sponsorship by industry-leading organisations and academic institutes have seen the workshop flourish year on year. It is therefore also an eagerly anticipated event within the Transport and Logistics Industry as well as beyond. Sponsors like DAAD – The German Academic Exchange Service, Development Bank Namibia, Southern Business School Namibia (SBS Namibia), Walvis Bay Corridor Group (WBCG) and Namibia Breweries Limited are just some of the organisations that will make this year’s workshop a success.

Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST), DAAD and SBS Namibia not only help make the workshop happen through financial and ‘in-kind’ sponsorship, but they also are knowledge partners and bring essential and sector-relevant input into the workshop sessions. WBCG’s CEO, Johny Smith will deliver the keynote address and a case study of the group will also be presented during the workshop.  Delivering and sharing high calibre logistics success stories, best practices and seminars. These organisations are joined by expert participants from the logistics and transport sector, government, industry, as well as academia and logistics students.

The theme this year focuses on the opportunity the Namibian logistics hub provides. The development surrounding the logistics hub is receiving attention from government, policy makers and planners to drive the attraction of international investors and organisations. The theme will highlight the developments within the country and looks at opportunities for future trade. It will include sharing and implementation of best practices as well as systems and case studies within the logistics and transport industry.

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Key topics that will be covered during the two-day event include:

DAY ONE:

  • Customs and Excise and its promotion within the logistics hub
  • Future of transport in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Investment and Financing opportunities for the sector

DAY 2:

  • The role of private sector in promoting port development
  • Supply Chain Visualisations and Freight Forwarder Challenges

Logan Fransman, Director of the NGCL said; “This is our 9th Annual Logistics and Transport Workshop and we couldn’t be prouder of having these great sponsors support us and the vitally important Transportation and Logistics sector through this Workshop.  The Government of Namibia identified logistics and transport sector as critical to the development of all sectors of the economy and our theme this year; Namibia as a Logistics Hub: An Opportunity will stimulate further development in this sector and boost growth and ultimately the economy.”

 The two day workshop takes place in Walvis Bay’s Protea Hotel, Pelican Bay from October 4-6th, 2017. To attend the workshops please contact: Mercelyne Maletzky, 061 2072909 or e-mail mmaletzky@nust.na

Alternatively, follow this link: http://www.centreforlogistics.org/

 

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NGCL promotes Big Data Initiative 2.0 at Conference

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Namibian-German Centre for Logistics (NGCL) of the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) knows that information and data is king. With this understanding, they launched a Big Data Initiative in March 2016,.  an interdisciplinary collaborative research programme whose aim was to map and explore how, where, when and why, Internet of Things and Big Data transformations are happening in the transport and logistics sector. As part of this initiative, NUST and NGCL will be hosting a conference on April 24, 2017. The objective is to launch the second phase of the Big Data Initiative for Logistics in Namibia.

Data and its analysis can give great insights into industries and specific sectors. The Logistics sector is no different. Using technology to analyse data, the logistics sector can improve efficiency, bring down costs and help companies to grow by streamlining their supply chains. Different academics will be presenting their papers and research at this conference taking place at the NUST Hotel School on April 2017 and starts at 08:00 a.m. till 15:00 p.m.

The topics to be discussed during the seminar include:

  • The Future of Logistics in Namibia
  • Technology for Big Data Management in Logistics
  • Data Analytics in Logistics
  • Application of Big Data in Logistics & Supply Chain Systems Performance Measurement

Aside from these topics there will also be discussions on logistics and Big Data, as well as how to financially profit from implementing Big Data in logistics.

 NGCL engaged various stakeholders, both private and public sector as to how immense volumes of data can be captured, stored, and processed. As well as finding an optimum way to gleam knowledge from such big data sets that can be applied to benefit logistics companies, government, communities, and individuals in Namibia. The National Road Safety Council (NRSC) was one such stakeholder that was engaged where the Road Safety Information Management System’s (RSIMS) accuracy and completeness of road accident data sets was assessed.

Building on these and other developments, the launch of Big Data Initiative 2.0 (BDI 2.0) on Monday 24 April 2017 at the NUST Hotel School will bring together key stakeholders from academia, industry and policy actors to discuss and deliberate on this collaborative research initiative.

Logan Fransman, Director of NGCL said; “Big Data is what is now fuelling and changing every business and changing the way in which whole industries operate. It will change business right here in Namibia as well and NGCL and NUST are at the forefront in logistics sector in Namibia and are therefore embracing the BDI 2.0 together with our stakeholders. We hope to welcome a great number of attendees on Monday April 24, 2017.”

Logan Fransman

For more information:

Mr. Logan Fransman
Director
Namibia German Centre for Logistics (NGCL)
Tel: +264 61 207 2909
E-mail: lfransman@nust.na

Workshop Report: Civilizing Resource Investments and Extractive Industries: Societal Negotiations and the Role of Law – 22.-23.09.2016, at the Center for Development Research, University of Bonn

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The accelerating global scramble for natural resources has continued to push the accumulation of land and other natural resources to ever new frontiers, especially the ‘global south’. Increasing investments in the global south were driven by the availability of resources and the increased profitability of investments in ‘risky’ environments during periods of raw material price hikes until the late 2000s. Furthermore, investments in the rather weak institutional and regulatory context of ‘developing’ countries seemed to be easier to implement and more profitable than under the highly regulated conditions in the ‘developed’ world.

The tendency to ignore the environmental and social externalities of large investments in resources in the ‘global south’ has long been criticized and opposed by activists. Local activism and international campaigns have raised public awareness in the global north and political advocacy as well, as consumer pressure have contributed to the generation of – albeit largely voluntary – international standards  but also national laws meant to curb the most devastating consequences of resource investments and extraction. Resource accumulation and extraction has also given rise to a vivid academic debate about the macro- and micro-environmental, socio-economic, and political impact of investments as well as effective strategies to oppose, control and steer investments in order to prevent or mitigate negative impacts.

This workshop contributed to this ongoing debate in two ways:

On the one hand, it tried to understand how investments and resource extraction are negotiated in societies in in the ‘global south’. The focus was on the rather confused and complicated linkages between global, national and local arenas. Large international investments are often promoted by international agencies as well as national governments in the home and host countries and allegedly operate within the framework of international guidelines and national legislation. Nevertheless, the way they are implemented and the way their impacts are contained is not straightforward, but depends on negotiation processes – often conflicts – in which different actors such as companies, governments, international agencies, international, national and local NGOs, CBOs, and a broad variety of local stakeholders engage with varying and changing strategies and in varying and changing networks and coalitions. Here the focus of our interest was rather on extra-legal negotiations and coalition-building strategies and their outcomes.

On the other hand, large parts of these negotiations are supposed to be framed by guidelines, laws, and regulations, to be enshrined in environmental – and social licensing processes, or are ultimately adjudicated in courts. These institutional frameworks, and the fundamental rights for citizens and the environment they instill, are the outcome of decades of opposition, awareness raising and advocacy. They carry a high symbolic value and they could provide the foundation for civilizing resource investment and extractive industries. We therefore discussed processes of legislation and regulation, but also the ways laws and rules are unmade or circumvented, and citizen and environmental rights become emptied in the legal and administrative field. The later, for instance, could be the result of transnational investment agreements, the failure to define the duties of enforcement, the weighing of competing rights, through procedural means, or because of the particular habitus of the legal social field.

The workshop brought together senior resource persons and post-graduate students to spark a discussion between senior scientists with rich theoretical background and practical experience with upcoming scholars with rich empirical material. While the former provided theoretical input and historical background to the debate, the post-graduate students presented and discussed their work in progress.

Of the 18 participants who attended the workshop, 14 presented on the topic, among them GGCDS (Ghanaian-German Centre for Development Studies) PhD-students Maliam Acio and Asaah Mohammed from Ghana as well as Grace Kamugisha and Naomi Gichuki from TGCL (Tanzanian-German Centre for Eastern Africa Legal Studies), Tanzania. Furthermore, Martina Shakya from IEE (Institute of Development Research and Development Policy Ruhr-University Bochum, partner of the South African German Centre for Development Research), Prof. Amanor (Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana) and Prof. Diaby-Pentzlin (University for Applied Sciences Wismar) contributed presentations on land issues in West Africa to the workshop. Bruno Milanez (Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil) and Gustavo Gazzinelli (Councilor, State Council of Water Resources, Minas Gerais, Brazil) enriched the workshop with examples from Brazil on the topics of water and mining.

During the two days of the workshop, the participating PhD-Students and Senior Experts from eight different countries in Europe, Africa, Latin America and Asia had intensive and fruitful debates and a vivid exchange of ideas and experience. The participants’ scientific interaction will continue as the publication of an edited volume has been planned.

The workshop was made possible with the financial funding from the DAAD (through the Bonn International Graduate School – Development Research and the Ghanaian-German Centre for Development Studies). We would like to express our thanks to everyone who contributed to the success of this workshop, in particular to all participants for their valuable inputs and to the DAAD for the financial support.