South Africa, Research Network, Transnational Criminal Justice (former TRANSCRIM)

Conference Programme: Third Conference Of The African-German Research Network – Part II – Zoom (Online) 2021

Part II: The African-German Research Network for Transnational Criminal Justice is grateful for receiving superb paper abstracts and is looking forward to the second part of its third annual research conference on “Transnational Criminal Law in Africa: Legal and Institutional Frameworks and Challenges” from Alumnae and Alumni of the South African-German Centre for Transnational Criminal Justice. Please find details in the conference programme.

Registration is mandatory via transcrim@rewi.hu-berlin.de.

Third Conference Of The African-German Research Network – Part II – Zoom (Online) 2021

Call for Applications

Alumni-Conference: “Transnational Criminal Law in Africa: Legal and Institutional Frameworks and Challenges”

29th October and 5th November 2021 via Zoom (online)

 

After the first two very fruitful sessions of the third annual research conference, the African-German Research Network for Transnational Criminal Justice organizes the conference’s second part and invites abstracts on corruption and money laundering in the context of “Transnational Criminal Law in Africa: Legal and Institutional Frameworks and Challenges” from Alumnae and Alumni of the South African-German Centre for Transnational Criminal Justice.

Please find details in the Call for Applications.

Conference Programme: Third Conference of the African-German Research Network – Zoom (Online) 2021

The African-German Research Network for Transnational Criminal Justice is thankful for receiving excellent paper abstracts and is looking forward to its third annual research conference on “Transnational Criminal Law in Africa: Legal and Institutional Frameworks and Challenges” from Alumnae and Alumni of the South African-German Centre for Transnational Criminal Justice. Please find details in the conference programme.

Registration is mandatory via transcrim@rewi.hu-berlin.de.

Third Conference of the African-German Research Network – Zoom (Online) 2021

Call for Abstracts

Alumni-Conference: “Transnational Criminal Law in Africa: Legal and Institutional Frameworks and Challenges”

28th May, 4th June, 22nd October and 29th October 2021 via Zoom (online)

The African-German Research Network for Transnational Criminal Justice organizes its third annual research conference and invites abstracts on “Transnational Criminal Law in Africa: Legal and Institutional Frameworks and Challenges” from Alumnae and Alumni of the South African-German Centre for Transnational Criminal Justice.

Please find details in the Call for Applications.

Alumni-Conference: “International and Transnational Criminal Law in Africa: Practice, Challenges and Prospects” October and December 2020 Zoom (online)

The African-German Research Network for Transnational Criminal Justice has successfully organized its second annual research conference on “International and Transnational Criminal Law in Africa: Practice, Challenges and Prospects” from Alumni of the South African-German Centre for Transnational Criminal Justice in October and December 2020 via Zoom

The fruitful presentations and debates on the conference assessed the extent to which African states have implemented international and transnational criminal law through a critical examination of their legal frameworks, the nature and capacity of the legal enforcement and institutional frameworks adopted to criminalize, investigate and prosecute international crimes as well as the legal, institutional or practical challenges for effective implementation. Besides having a substantial majority of state parties to the International Criminal Court, African countries have established various ad hoc tribunals and adopted several legal and institutional frameworks at the regional and national levels as evidence of their stance against impunity for international crimes.

In his article, Leon Trampe, student assistant of the Network, gives an overview of the excellent paper abstracts and presentations at the conference. Please find the report here.

New Volume: South African Journal of Criminal Justice

The African-German Research Network for Transnational Criminal Justice is proud to announce that the 33rd volume of the South African Journal of Criminal Justice including peer-reviewed papers from our Network’s inaugural annual conference from 20 to 24 November 2019 on “Transitional Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa“ has recently been published.

The South African Journal of Criminal Justice is an accredited, specialist legal journal publishing articles, comments, surveys of recent cases, and book reviews in the field of criminal justice, with a particular emphasis on southern Africa. The focus of the journal is on criminal law, criminal procedure, evidence, international criminal law, and criminology. The Network’s director Prof. Dr. Gerhard Werle is part of the editorial board and the Network’s advisory board member Prof. Dr. Gerhard Kemp serves as editor. More information about the periodical can be found here.

Information on the Network and the table of contents of the third issue can be found here.

UWC Centres of Excellence training workshop on the new DigiFace digital teaching and learning platform

In the first week of December 2020, the two UWC DAAD Centres of Excellence – the South African-German Centre for Development Research SA-GER CDR and the South African German Centre for Transnational Criminal Justice TRANSCRIM – took part in a training workshop on the use of the new DigiFace digital teaching and learning platform. Colleagues from Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, who are managing partners of the DigiFace project, organized and run the training workshop in a venue close to Cape Town.

DigiFace – short for “Digital Initiative for African Centres of Excellence” – is a new project funded by DAAD that aims at supporting and facilitating Higher Education learning and research at all DAAD African Centres of Excellence. The project is strengthening the Centres’ digital competencies as well as the networking among all the Centres – between all institutions involved, between staff, students, and alumni.

Core element of the DigiFace-initiative is the creation and establishment of a central interactive digital platform which is based on the Moodle learning management system. Participants in the training workshop started to develop course material and got a good understanding of both theoretical and practical knowledge required to make full use of the different tools and facilities of the platform. The workshop that way supported both Centres in offering course designs suitable for blended and hybrid learning, – both essential elements of the current and future learning environment at UWC. The two Centres, going forward, are joining forces to promote the use of the new platform in their respective institutes, and to collaborate more closely within the digital infrastructure that the new DigiFace project provides.

Members and facilitators of the training workshop: (back row right to left): Prof. John-Mark Iyi (UWC / TRANSCRIM), Lance Scheepers (UWC / SA-GER CDR), Ruth Knoblich (UWC / SA-GER CDR), Dr. Nortje Windell (UWC / TRANSCRIM), Elmien Waring (NMU Port Elizabeth), and Mike Swanepoel (NMU Port Elizabeth); (front row right to left): Shamiso Mandioma (UWC / SA-GER CDR), Karlien Potgieter (NMU Port Elizabeth), Prof. Paul Webb (NMU Port Elizabeth), and Dr. Michael Nguatem Belebema (UWC / SA-GER CDR).

Alumni-Conference: “Transitional Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa” 20th – 24th November 2019 Berlin, Germany

The African-German Research Network for Transnational Criminal Justice (“Network”) held its first annual conference on “Transitional Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa” between 20th and 24th November 2019 in Berlin at Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. In their article, Nicksoni Filbert, researcher at the Network, and Nella Sayatz, project coordinator of the Network, give an overview about the presentations at the conference and summarize the main results of the conference’s discussions. Please find the report here.

The Network was established after the 10-year-funding period for the South African-German Centre for Transnational Criminal Justice (“Centre”), which was supported by DAAD and offered an LL.M.- and PhD-Programme, has ended in 2018. It aims to provide the very successful Alumni of the Centre with the basis and the resources to further their academic and personal exchange. The Network is directed by Prof. Dr. Gerhard Werle at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and supported by DAAD and the German Federal Foreign Office.

In addressing legacies of gross human rights violations, Transitional Justice is usually considered as instrumental in establishing, amongst others, the rule of law, reconciliation, and democracy. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the approaches used over the last decades evince a lot of diversity, in the wake of many countries in the region recovering from protracted conflict or dictatorial regimes. Recent developments in countries such as Ethiopia, South Sudan, or Zimbabwe once more highlight the relevance of the field. While Transitional Justice mechanisms have to be tailored to meet the requirements of the specific situation, analyzing and comparing different approaches can provide valuable insights that can be used to develop best practices and improve the implementation of Transitional Justice.

For more information about the African-German Research Network for Transnational Criminal Justice visit transcrim.org.

 

United States Foreign Policy, Global Magnisky Act &Social Media Monitoring in Uganda

United States Foreign Policy , Global Magnisky Act and Social Media Monitoring in Uganda

 

By Samuel Matsiko

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On 27th August 2019,Ismail Ajjawi a  Palestinian student admitted to Harvard University was detained at Boston International Airport, denied entry into the United States and his visa was cancelled. According to a statement issued to the Harvard Crimson by Ismail Ajjawi, the immigration officers deported him after they disapproved of his friend’s political comments on social media. 

In the past few days, several Ugandan officials including the permanent secretary to the judiciary Pius Bigirimana, deputy secretary-general of the ruling National Resistance Movement party Richard Twondongo, National Resistance Movement deputy treasurer Keneth Omona, Spokesperson of the National Resistance Movement secretariat Rogers Mulindwwa, Army  General Peter Elewulu and assistant inspector of police Asuman Mugenyi were denied US visas on allegations of corruption and human rights violations.  

This comes weeks after the US Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control sanctioned the former inspector general of  the Uganda police force General Kale Kayihura under the Global Magnitsky Act. The Department also publicly designated his spouse, Angela Umurisa Gabuka, his daughter, Tesi Uwibambe, and his son, Kale Rudahigwa.

However, we need to look way beyond the allegations of corruption and human rights violations and look at the digital footprint of these individuals and their affiliates. What social media data did some of these individuals submit during their visa applications? What is their social media inventory including that of their affiliates and superiors for the last five years?  How is social media monitoring shaping domestic and foreign policy? Why we need to pay attention to social media monitoring by Governments.

The United States federal government agencies, in particular, the Department of Homeland Security and the Customs and Border Protection Agency have expanded their social media monitoring programs. At the beginning of June 2019, the United States State Department issued a social media policy for all visa applications. The policy requires all visa applicants to submit social media accounts they have used in the last five years including emails and accounts with end to end encrypted messaging applications like WhatsApp and telegram.

Such social media account information would give the United States government access to photos, locations, dates of birth,  IP addresses, religious opinions, political opinions and other personal data commonly shared on social media. This would probably make the United States the social media data capital of the world considering the millions of annual United States visa application.

The United States  Customs and Border Protection Agency uses social media monitoring software. The most notable software is dunami a product of a silicon valley company PATHAR linked to a CIA venture capital firm called In-Q-Tel. These digital tools were initially designed to determine networks of association and the potential of radicalisation on the war on terror. However, the tools can also be used to collect data points on individuals who commit gross human rights violations. 

American soft power is declining in a world where the global agenda is shaped by Twitter feeds. Two years ago, President Donald Trump’s budget director, Mick Mulvaney, proclaimed a hard power budget that would have slashed funding for the State Department and the US Agency for International Development. Uganda is beginning to experience this American foreign policy hard power through the Global Magnisky Act.  The United States to deny several senior  Ugandan government officials visas after years of mutual cooperation is totally unprecedented. I may not have evidence to substantiate my arguments but the United States must have collected a treasure trove of data points on these individuals and their affiliates to have an evidence-based reason to deny them visas.

Uganda with a social media tax regime is a very unique country when it comes to social media. Interesting social media cases include but not limited to city lawyer Fred Muwema v Facebook, Havard Student Hillary Seguya’s suit against  President Yoweri Museveni for blocking him on Twitter and Dr Stella Nyanzi’s conviction for cyber harassment. 

This year the  Uganda Communications Commission a regulatory body hired a social media monitoring personnel and issued a policy for social media influencers to register with the commission. A time has come for Ugandans and the world to pay critical attention to their digital footprint. Social media and the Global Magnisky Act is influencing domestic and foreign policy way beyond our likes and shares.

Samuel Matsiko is a Ugandan lawyer